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Admirez la splendeur du monde dans les plus beaux clichés de la World Photography Organisation

Dans le domaine de la photographie, il existe de nombreuses entreprises et organisations célèbres pour la qualité des clichés qu’elles dévoilent : World Photography Organisation est de celles-ci. Grace à sa plateforme, elle met en lumière le travail d’amateurs et de professionnels du monde entier et offre un aperçu de leur talent via sa page Instagram.

Si vous ne connaissez pas son nom, peut-être avez-vous déjà entendu parler du concours annuel qu’elle organise : les Sony World Photography Awards récompensent chaque année des photographes du monde entier et de tous âges en les classant par catégorie. Architecture, art conceptuel, paysage, nature, portrait, sport et culture sont mis à l’honneur lors de l’évènement tenu par la World Photographie Organisation (WPO) mais aussi tout au long de l’année via son site internet et ses réseaux sociaux. Sur Instagram, l’organisation partage des clichés en tout genre, accompagnés d’informations sur le travail des artistes.

We go on a journey through #Iceland with @salvalopez – #anothericelandicroadtrip #WPOfavs

Une publication partagée par World Photography Organisation (@worldphotoorg) le

This week we go on a journey through #Iceland with @salvalopez – #anothericelandicroadtrip #WPOfavs

Une publication partagée par World Photography Organisation (@worldphotoorg) le

Acid mine drainage, Blesbokspruit, Emalahleni (Witbank), Mpumalanga, 2011. Large coal deposits have given rise to widespread mining operations in the area. This has resulted in water systems being contaminated by acid mine drainage, which contains large quantities of metals. Photo by @ilangodfrey, from the series ‘Legacy of the Mine’. “Exploring the consequences of mining on South Africa’s land and people, I am unsettled by what lies ahead. The need for economic growth cannot be ignored but neither can the sustainability of the earth and water for generations to come.” Ilan Godfrey was born in Johannesburg, South Africa. He works with various institutions and organisations worldwide and has been recognised locally and internationally by various photography awards including POPCAP Prize Africa, the Leica Oskar Barnack Award, the OPEN Photo Award, the International Photography Award and the Magenta Flash Forward Award among others. #WPOfavs #SouthAfrica #Mining #Landscape

Une publication partagée par World Photography Organisation (@worldphotoorg) le

West Wits Pit, West Rand, Krugersdorp, Gauteng, 2012. The man-made cavity known as West Wits Pit is the remnant of early mine workings on the Kimberley Reef, where gold deposits were exploited near the surface. Today, Mintails Ltd reclaims and processes the remaining gold from the mine dump tailings that dot the West Rand and uses the cavity for disposing of the remaining gold plant residue. Hazardous waste materials include processed slurry and discharged water from mining operations. Photo by @ilangodfrey, from the series ‘Legacy of the Mine’. “Exploring the consequences of mining on South Africa’s land and people, I am unsettled by what lies ahead. The need for economic growth cannot be ignored but neither can the sustainability of the earth and water for generations to come.” Ilan Godfrey was born in Johannesburg, South Africa. He works with various institutions and organisations worldwide and has been recognised locally and internationally by various photography awards including POPCAP Prize Africa, the Leica Oskar Barnack Award, the OPEN Photo Award, the International Photography Award and the Magenta Flash Forward Award among others. #WPOfavs #SouthAfrica #Mining #Landscape

Une publication partagée par World Photography Organisation (@worldphotoorg) le

This week on #WPOfavs we feature @matildegattoni and her series ‘The Dark Side of Tea’ – Matilde is an award-winning French-Italian photographer. Her work focuses on human rights issues around the world, especially in war-torn countries. Photo: India, West Bengal: Mina Sharma, 45, posing inside her house at Mogulkata Tea Estate, in the Dooars region. The woman started working as a plucker when she was 30, after taking over her mother’s job. Once she will retire, she hopes her 25-year-old married daughter will take her position, otherwise Sharma would lose her house and plot of land which, like all the other properties within the tea estate, belong to the company. With no money to buy another dwelling, the woman has no other option but to keep on living here. #India #Tea

Une publication partagée par World Photography Organisation (@worldphotoorg) le

Photo by Martina Bisaz, aka @kitkat_ch – « The most photographed mountain in the world is the #Matterhorn. Understandable, isn’t it?. » #WPOfavs

Une publication partagée par World Photography Organisation (@worldphotoorg) le