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Contemplez l’incroyable travail de David Yarrow, l’un des meilleurs photographes animaliers du monde

En matière de photographie, chaque professionnel a son domaine de prédilection. Pour David Yarrow, la magie opère lorsqu’il focalise son objectif sur les petits et grands animaux : girafes, lions, ours et éléphants se dévoilent dans les clichés de l’artiste, partagés sur Instagram pour le plus grand plaisir des internautes.

Né à Glasgow en 1966, David Yarrow est devenu un photographe reconnu et acclamé pour ses clichés de la vie sauvage. Aujourd’hui ambassadeur Nikon, il continue de parcourir le monde pour immortaliser paysages, cultures et animaux dans des photographies magnifiques qui lui valent d’être exposées dans différentes galeries à travers le monde. Pour découvrir plus amplement son travail, rendez-vous vite sur son site internet, sa page Facebook ou son compte Instagram.

This is a hard-earned and timeless photograph – It has soul and a sense of place to it and I am proud to be responsible for its creation. There are many quiet days or weeks in the field, where there is nothing magical to capture and no transcending images with which to return. In my own crusade, this single image makes up for a great many of such days. ‘Heaven Can Wait’ has a biblical countenance – it is also primal and raw. The dramatic sky appears to be in communication with the only sign of life on the flat dustpan below. Indeed there is diagonal connectivity across the whole image as the dust tracks of the giraffe lead the eye to the animal, which then takes the eye to the talkative sky. The image conveys the arid and elemental habitat that is Lake Amboseli at the end of the dry season and the implicit contradiction of life on its inhospitable canvas. . To take this image, I employed three of my key rules for filming in East Africa but then broke a fourth. The first two rules of working against the light and then employing a wide angle rather than telephoto lens were instinctive, but the third rule of working as close to the ground as possible was practically challenging in that we were chasing the lone giraffe in a jeep driving at 30 miles an hour on a crusty dry lake. The trick was to shoot blind from an outstretched hand leaning downwards to the ground from the jeep. This was – I knew – a low-percentage shot. . We encountered the isolated giraffe late one afternoon on the dry lake, and it immediately seemed core to the prevailing mood to emphasise the dust being licked up by the giraffe’s hoofs. Amboseli is about dust and its capture should make the picture, not be ancillary to it. This meant not only shooting into the late light but also shooting from behind the giraffe. This was at odds with a fairly standard rule of mine to be positioned ahead or at least parallel to a moving subject – but given all the other factors involved; it appeared that breaking this rule would be the most effective way to tell the story. We are in the wild, not a studio, and it is often better to just go with the flow, think spontaneously and break rules.

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This powerful image of a large bull bison was captured this week in Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming. It is as good as I can do and probably my most impactful animal portrait for some time. The bison is an emblematic North American animal that roamed the continent millions of years before man. When fully grown, it is a massive beast that deserves our respect and recognition. When I was researching bison last week, I quickly understood two things – firstly that some rogue bulls carry a serious threat if their space is invaded and secondly that the adult face is both prehistoric and enormous. The bison is all about the face and I sensed that any picture that didn’t recognise this, would miss my goals. My instincts were that the image also needed a sense of “Yellowstone in the winter” and this, combined with the need for proximity, all pointed to a ground level, remote control approach. To work with ground level radio controlled cameras and a prime wide angle is very much my signature style, but it is easier with elephants in Amboseli, than bison in Yellowstone. This is partly because this oldest of American National Parks is heavily regulated by young and overly keen wardens and partly because the snow is very deep in places. This is not an easy location – 95% of Yellowstone is out of bounds in February. It is the most geothermally active park in the world, throw avalanches, wolves and bears into the mix and we have a primordial soup of creation. I failed about 15 times with my camera positioning and I tweaked my lens/camera combination constantly. It was most frustrating and I was generally grumpy. But yesterday afternoon about 2 pm, it all came together. The trees and the sky are most helpful additives – but what a face and what a back structure. I haven’t seen this sort of image before of a big bison. I would like to thank Tom Murphy, one of America’s most acclaimed nature photographers, for assisting me on this assignment. We are both excited to see a life size print of “The American Idol”.

Une publication partagée par David Yarrow Photography© (@davidyarrow) le

Off to the cold again tomorrow….North America is one of my favourite assignment destinations – especially when it is very cold!

Une publication partagée par David Yarrow Photography© (@davidyarrow) le

The Puzzle – It’s 5 years old, but it still grabs the eye. Not my strongest picture, but perhaps the one that everyone wants for someone.

Une publication partagée par David Yarrow Photography© (@davidyarrow) le

Flashback to a year ago today in #China…still seems like yesterday! #Siberians #siberiantiger

Une publication partagée par David Yarrow Photography© (@davidyarrow) le

TAKE OFF Alaska, USA – 2016 I prefer to work with big alpha animals – elephants have a greater pull on me than mice. This is true also with birds and this has drawn me towards the American Bald eagle – a magnificent and emblematic creature with an astonishing wingspan of up to seven feet. The difficulty is capturing imagery that captures fresh detail – the world is not short of images of this bird – indeed they adorn homes in America from the White House down. The starting point for me was always going to be the wings – their size and textural detail. However, the more I worked on this project in Alaska, the more I was disappointed by my “in flight” work – I struggled to do the wings justice. The problem was simply that in flight, the wings do look big, but there is a disconnect to anything that gives real scale – a “big sky” does not help as it excludes much of what could help define and give context. I travelled to the fishing village of Homer – a great place to spot great Bald eagles, especially in the winter and spring and sure enough there were a great number of eagles on the beach. It was then a question of getting sufficiently close to work with as small a telephoto as possible. Instinctively, eagles will tend to take off away from an intruder, not towards him and to engineer the effect captured I had to use decoys to encourage the eagle’s first wing movement in my direction. Finally, it came off – and I think this is indeed a fresh image of a bald eagle. What remarkable wings and all the more remarkable at take-off.

Une publication partagée par David Yarrow Photography© (@davidyarrow) le

For anyone that owns this image – The Killer – well done. Another sale in NYC yesterday means that it is as good as sold out.

Une publication partagée par David Yarrow Photography© (@davidyarrow) le

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